Encouraging Bottom Feeders: Consequences for Clients
Law Schooled Evolution / 26 de agosto de 2017

We all came into law school thinking we were the pick of the litter, the top of the top, rarely failing at anything we did, and rarely ever feeling like we couldn’t achieve anything as long as we put our minds to it. Then came 1L year.  Our first round of exams.  Fear, panic, examination, fear, panic, grade.  Oh, crud.  Look at that.  I’m at the bottom half of the class.  In every single class.  Now, what?  Well, I could try to improve and see if I can climb up to the top half somehow, but am I really going to hit the top 1/4 or even top 1/3?  Doesn’t seem likely.  At this point, I know I’m just not IT.  That I don’t have the IT.  And, I’m starting to realize that most of my professors had IT during law school and can’t really empathize with my lack of IT. Some professors verbally reinforce this awful feeling, as I recall more than one saying:  “Your first semester grades indicate how you will do for the rest of your law school career”.  Some were kind to add that a few of us might be the anomaly if we worked hard…

JD v. MBA: Teaching Methodologies and Working with Lawyers
Law Schooled Evolution / 26 de agosto de 2017

In this podcast, a JD and MBA compare and contrast law and business school. CLICK THE FOLLOWING TO LISTEN TO:  JD v MBA     Heard round the block: If you, law student, want to have a client simulation course and learn to work in groups, take a course at the business school. If you think business school is so great, transfer to business school or get a JD/MBA. Law students need to learn more theory rather than skills because lawyers are professionals, while those who work in business are not. Law students do not need leadership skills because they will enter the working world through an apprenticeship system. Law students need to learn to follow, not lead. Law students should not and cannot learn people skills, because they enter law school without them, do not have it within them to learn, and will spend most of their time working on their own when they get to the real world anyway. Law students get sufficient experiential learning through summer internships, semester externships, and clinics. Law students do not need specialization in their second and third years, because lawyers use generalized legal knowledge when they practice. Thoughts? If you’re so inclined,…

“Do you have a job yet?” – A Culture of Silence
Law Schooled Evolution / 26 de agosto de 2017

Most 3Ls who don’t live under a rock get it.  You don’t ask about it, and you don’t brag if you got one.  However, 1Ls and 2Ls often enthusiastically and optimistically bust out with the question:  ”So, do you have a job yet?” up until they hit the summer job hunt season for their year, when they start to learn the culture of silence.  Then, there are the practicing attorneys and sometimes even professors, who seem to live in another universe.  What’s a good topic for small talk?  Law student employment of course. Question:  ”So what are you doing after graduation?” Answer:  ”Studying for the bar” Follow up question:  ”And do you know where you’re going yet?” Answer:  ”Probably my parent’s basement” Would it be better if we made a sign for people:  ”Please respect the culture of silence and do not ask students whether they have a job”? Or, should we break the culture of silence and start talking about what can be done to get higher rates of employment back? Some questions:  Why do admissions keep rising when demand for new lawyers still remains low?  Does the establishment of new law schools saturate the market even further?  Can we…